Introducing Intern: Abbie Hartman

St. John’s Cemetery Project is extremely fortunate to have Macquarie University PhD candidate Abbie Hartman as an intern. Abbie is an interdisciplinary historian of Public and Applied history whose work focuses on the public’s consumption of history and how the influence of media can shape and change this.

St Johns Pic 1
Abbie Hartman, PhD Candidate at Macquarie University and St. John’s Cemetery Project intern.

Her PhD thesis, ‘When This is All Over and the War is Won They Will Remember Us’: Public History, War and the Power of Memorialisation in Games, her Masters thesis completed in 2017, and several other projects she is working on examine how the general public understands and remembers conflict. As Abbie’s research has already uncovered, many young people currently studying history at the tertiary level report that their strong interest in history was initially sparked by the historical subject matter in video games they had played. For anyone who may question the relevance and value of the past and history as a field of inquiry in a rapidly changing world, Abbie’s findings are a reminder that history and ‘new media’ are by no means strange bedfellows. Indeed, her work confirms that the digital arena generally offers historians so many new, creative, fresh options in terms of how we can communicate our work to a wider audience than traditional textual histories have been able to reach.

One of Create NSW’s Arts and Cultural Development Program (ACDP) Priority Areas is in fact engaging young people. On the whole, the St. John’s Cemetery Project aims to do this by (1) presenting historical content in an accessible, non-commercial, multimodal digital arena and (2) extending the reach of that content via social media platforms. Social media in particular allows the material funded by Create NSW in the upcoming collection on “Old Parramattans” buried at St. John’s to engage not only older generations who are already well aware of the significance of the cemetery and the historical treasures it holds, but also has greater potential to “enter the feeds” and hopefully capture the attention of a younger demographic who have not had an opportunity to encounter Parramatta’s rich history and heritage sites. The internship itself is, likewise, a way the project is engaging one particular young person in the project and giving a young academic specifically the opportunity to apply her historical skills and build her academic C.V. with practical experience in a real life public history project.

Abbie’s expertise in public history and how best to inform the general public about their local and national histories via digitisation clearly makes her a real asset to SJO but, as Abbie herself notes, the opportunity is definitely mutually beneficial:

“The St. John’s Cemetery Project internship is the perfect opportunity to explore the theoretical frameworks I have been studying and apply them to a real life situation. In addition to this, I will be able to bring my expertise in digital history to the project to bring the forgotten stories of St. John’s Cemetery back to the forefront of public consciousness. Overall, Parramatta is a place which I hold dear to my heart and spent a lot of time in during my childhood. I would love to give back to the community which has always made me feel so welcome.”
St. John's Cemetery, Parramatta (2019)
St. John’s Cemetery, Parramatta (2019). Photo: Michaela Ann Cameron.

During her internship Abbie will be flexing her research muscles and immersing herself in digital archives as a database content developer. Chiefly, this means she will be assisting the St. John’s Cemetery Project Director, Dr. Michaela Ann Cameron, by creating profiles on the people buried in the cemetery and even fleshing out some of the details of their truly incredible lives. This work will help researchers when they come to the website and use the “SEARCH” database function, most likely looking for one of their ancestors. As such, Abbie is participating in constructing the part of the website that will be used by the public the most: the St. John’s Cemetery Project database. With Abbie’s vital contribution, the project will be able to deliver a fully functioning site-specific database to the public sooner rather than later and that, too, it is hoped will improve community engagement with the cemetery itself. You may also see Abbie doing some guest blogging on here!

Welcome to St. John’s Cemetery Project Abbie!


Read more about Abbie Hartman’s work on her Contributor profile here.